The Independent Golfer
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  Descriptions of 111
Scotland Golf Courses
 
"Unless otherwise stated, the descriptions below were written after my personal play of the course. For the remainder, I have included comments submitted by the club or its members." – The Independent Golfer
 
(1) back (Page 2. Courses E through K) Forward(3) (4)
 
 

Northeast Hub

Elgin Golf Club
In the Northeast
18 holes, par 69, 6416
link to course website

 
Elgin for Scotland Golf

I have not played this course and so cannot offer a personal description. The club describes its course as follows:

Founded in 1906, Elgin Golf Club is a testing heathland course measuring 6401 yards with a par of 69 and a standard scratch of 71, fully justifying its claim to be one of the finest inland courses in the northern part of Scotland. This course, a test to low and high handicap players alike, is always kept in immaculate condition by the greenstaff and, while playing one's round, there is the added beauty of the panoramic views - looking north over the city of Elgin, and to the south, the hills stretching to the distant Cairngorm Mountains.
In recent years, the club has hosted a number of Pro-Ams, and received great praise from the Tartan Tour professionals with regard to the standard of the course and conditions of the greens. One of the main features at Elgin are the eight par 4 holes over 400 yards, which are a severe test to all.

 
 

Fife Hub

Elie Golf House Club
In the Kingdom of Fife
18 holes, par 70, 6273 yards
link to course website

 
Elie Golf House Club, Scotland

Play at Elie and you are playing the home course of James Braid, five-time British Open champion and one of the great Scottish golfing luminaries of the early 20th century who was born just off the #4 fairway. More than that, you are playing a Scottish links course that has aged gracefully over the years and remains a much-desired destination for all who want to experience links golf as it was meant to be played. Power here is not nearly as important as craft and strategy intended to take advantage of the roll of the fairway and the direction of the wind. You will not need to deal with trees, water hazards, or thick gorse bushes, just the roll of the ancient sand dunes on which the links grasses now grow.

Unlike many links courses, Elie offers a considerable variation in altitude. After the first hole takes you up and over that initial hill, the second takes you even higher to a lovely view out over the village and the Firth of Forth and sets you up for a challenging, down-hill, 200+ yard par three. From here you work out over the links toward a delightful series of four holes along the beach and cliffs. If the play is light, you can even stop in for a quick pint at a local pub that waits just a few feet off the left of the #4 fairway.

The course is actually formed as two segments, one containing the first three and the 18th holes and the other containing holes 5 through 16. These sections are connected by a narrow strip through which run holes 4 and 17. Why so narrow? The story goes that, in about 1812 the farmer who owned the surrounding land claimed the then-existing course as his own. After 20 years of legal wrangling the Inner House of the Court of Session in Edinburgh decreed that the golfers could use as much of the disputed land as the best golfer could carry with one strike of the ball. Unfortunately, the club’s “best golfer” didn’t have a good day, dubbing his shot and covering less than 100 yards. Thus, the course is routed through this narrow strip even today.

Though the total yardage is relatively short (6273), having no par-5’s it can test your game with six holes over 400 yards and only one par-3 on each side. You will be asked to play a wide variety of shots, especially if the wind off the Firth is a factor. All in all, this is a delightful course that will be the source of fond memories and, perhaps, a tall tail of two to tell.

The Elie course claims to be the only golf course in the world that makes regular use of a submarine periscope. Mounted in the starter’s shed near the first tee and rising 30 feet above the golfers’ heads, the ‘scope, from the HMS Excaliber, is used by the starter to determine when the golfers who have disappeared up and over the hill after hitting their tee shots off #1 have moved safely out of range of those on the tee. If you like, the starter will enjoy letting you peer through his ‘scope’ before you tee off.

 
 

Northeast Hub

Forres Golf Course
In the Northeast
18 holes, par 70, 5906
link to course website

 
Forres for Scotland Golf

I have not played this course and so cannot offer a personal description. The club describes its course as follows:

Designed by Open Championship winners James Braid and Willie Park the Par 70 course is just less than 6300 yards from the tips and although not the longest by today’s standards it provides a good test for golfers of all abilities. Well known for its spectacular views over Findhorn Bay and the Moray Firth, Forres Golf Course is a beautifully maintained, picturesque and interesting layout that will satisfy all who play it. The course is full of memorable holes; none more so than the 16th, aptly named ‘Pond’ this is a spectacular hole where a watery grave awaits errant tee shots.

In its recent history Forres has been honoured to host events such as the Scottish Professional Championship, the Northern Open, and the Scottish Young Professionals Championships - a testimony to it’s quality.


 
 

Fife Hub

Forrester Park Golf Course
In the Kingdom of Fife
18 hole; par 72
link to course website

 
 

I have not played this course and so cannot offer a personal description. The club describes its course as follows:

"Forrester Park is set in the heart of 350 acres of what we believe to be some of East Central Scotland's most beautiful parkland. Having once been part of the great Keavil Estate, it was for the most part used as pastureland servicing the needs of the nearby ancient town of Dunfermline.

Since then a great transformation has taken place. We have managed to keep a strong sense of local heritage, as well as introducing our very own unique flavour, style and eccentricity to the park. It is our aim for everyone, both young and old to be able to come along and enjoy what we are very proud to be able to offer, with views stretching out over the Firth of Forth to Edinburgh, the Lothians and beyond."

 
 

Inverness Hub

Fort Augustus Golf Club
West of Inverness and east of Oban
9 hole; par 33
link to course website

 
Fort Augustus golf Course, Scotland
The golfers around Fort Augustus must have tried very hard to find a relatively flat expanse of land among their mountains, glens and locks on which to build their golf course. Their search paid off with a fine little nine-holer set in open spaces among the rolling fields of heather through which their fairways wind.
 
 

Oban Hub

Fort William Golf Club
Northwest of Oban
18 hole, par 68
link to course website

 
fort william golf Course, Scotland
The Fort William course is almost in the shadow of Ben Nevis, the UK’s highest mountain, and offers incomparable views of the head of Loch Linnhe and the mountains that line each side of the Great Glen. Though not an old course, it plays as if it is. The generous and springy fairways meander through humps, hillocks, valleys and swales without any great change in altitude but always with some. Because it has no par-5’s, the overall yardage is deceiving long. The course’s variety of holes will require you to dig deep into your bag for different shots to meet different situations.
 
 

Dornoch Hub
Inverness Hub

Fortrose and Rosemarkie Golf Club
North of Inverness
18 holes, par 71
link to course website

 
Fort Rose colg course, Scotland

Dramatically situated on the Chanonry Ness that thrusts out into the Moray Firth, the geographical location of the Fortrose and Rosemarkie Course is unrivaled anywhere as another great design by James Braid. You play with ocean on three sides, some times within mere yards of the tidelands, over links land spotted with gorse bushes throughout the course. The lighthouse at the end of the ness (headland) is almost always in sight. The course even boasts its own school of dolphins that can often be seen playing off of the first five fairways.

This course has a written record of play since 1702 and must have been a golfing site much earlier. The club was chartered in 1888 and the present layout, with only minor changes, dates from 1924. This layout presents you with a number of interesting holes that can change their nature dramatically as the wind which may always be a factor here, shifts but you will find you are playing a true Scottish Links Golf Course.
 
 

Northeast Hub

Fraserburgh Golf Club
In the Northeast
18 holes, par 71 and 9 holes, par 31
link to course website

  Fraserburgh for Scotland Golf The members of Fraserburgh are rightly proud of their club, their course and its history. They have hard evidence that golf was played on their grounds as far back as 1613 when church records show that one John Burnett was chastised for playing “gouff” on the Sabbath. Further, they cite records showing that they are the 5th oldest club in Scotland and the 7th oldest in world! Such ancient credentials are claimed by members who play a delightful links course, located in the very north-east of Scotland. The work of the first two holes, to climb up and then over the prominence called Corbie Hill, is rewarded when you begin, at hole #3, a delightful ramble across classic links land of ancient, grass-covered dunes, winding valleys, hollows, and ridges that taxes your skill as much as it delights your senses. This is golf it has been played in Scotland for hundreds of years. One moment you are working your way along a natural fairway in a shallow valley sheltered by grassy hills. The next you find yourself teeing off from the summit of a high knob with sweeping views of the ancient town and harbor of Fraserburgh and the North Sea beyond. Like most of the great links courses of north-eastern Scotland, the premium at Fraserburgh is on strategy supported by good shot-making. Bombing and wedging must give way to judicious club selection, tactical navigation and keen awareness of hazards to be avoided as well as advantageous lines to be taken.
 
 

Dornoch Hub
Oban Hub

Gairloch Golf Club
Northwest of Invernesss
9 holes, par 31
link to course website

 
Gairloch golf course, Scotland

This imaginative little course serves well to add the golf dimension to the extensive range of other recreational opportunities you can enjoy in Gairloch. Like many nine-holers across the highlands, Gairloch was established in the late 1890’s as a part of the plan to build the local area into a destination for vacationers from the south. It was to serve both the golfing needs of the locals and as an additional attraction to holiday-makers who would come to hike, ride horses, fish and sail.
Within these nine holes is a great range, from the delicate 88 yard blind shot on #7 to the narrow and demanding par-5 #8 with its blind second shot over a towering bluff. It is a short course with 6 par-3’s but it takes two times around to get a good feeling for these differing holes.

One of Gairloch’s best features is the views that you get of the nearby mountains, the village with its beautiful crescent beach and the rocky peninsulas and islands that populate the bay. On most days you see out, across the Minch to the Isle of Skye in the distance.
 
 

Ayr Hub

Girvan Golf Club
In Southern Ayrshire
18 hole, par 64, 5064 yards
link to course website

 
 

This small course is just different, in a number of ways. First, it offers the interesting feature of beginning with eight links holes that run along the sea and offer the same magnificent views of the Firth of Clyde and Ailsa Craig that have been made famous by televised shots from the neighbor up the coat, Royal Turnberry. Then the course leaves the sea and winds up, over a small hill to take on a very different, inland nature for the last 10 holes.

Though the par at 64 would suggest a short, managable course, 5 of its 8 3-pars are over 200 yards. You will be especially challanged by the 243 yard, par-3 #8, but the strangest is the 221 yard #17 which requires you to hit a green that is located 20 up the side of a steep bank. Reaching this imposing target requires a carry of at least 190 yards, and that is if the prevailing wind is not blowing in your face. Because hitting your tee shot into the bank is deadly, many players lay up. How many courses have you layed with a par-3 hole that calls for a lay-up?

 
 

Ayr Hub

Glasgow Gailes Golf Club
In Ayrshire
18 hole, par 71, 6539 yards
link to course website

 
 

Rated by many as one of the best links courses in Scotland, The Gailes offers the true challenge of links golf at its best. It is always used as a qualifying site for the British Open when it is played on Scotland’s west coast.

With the exceptions of a few trees scattered about, the course is generally wide open, with fairways classically defined and bordered by heather and gorse. At over 6500 yards with only two par-5’s, you have your work cur out for you, but enjoyable work it is! After all, you are playing on a course that was laid out in 1892 by no less than Willie Park of Musselburgh. This is links golf at its best.

 
 

Oban Hub

Glencruitten (Oban) Golf Club
In Oban
18 hole, par 61
link to course website

 
Glencruitten golf course, Scotland This short but very hilly course allows you to test your short game to the maximum. Many holes have blind shots, change elevation radically, or both. It is well maintained and provides a good addition to the many recreational opportunities offered by the tourist town of Oban, the “Gateway to the Isles.” Like only a very few other courses in the highlands, Glencruitten does not have names for its golf holes.
 
 

Dornoch Hub

Golspie Golf Club
North of Dornoch
18 holes, par 68
link to course website

 
Golspie Golf Course, Scotland

The people at Golspie claim that their course offers three kinds of play: links, heathland and parkland. In fact, all of Golspie plays like a classic links course. It does feature a few holes, labeled heathland, that are cut through beautiful fields of heather and gorse and two holes adjacent to a Scotch pine forest that are labeled parkland. Still, the geography of all the fairways and greens and the nature of the grasses that cover them make Golspie play like a links course which is, of course, Golspie’s strength.
Golspie’s generally broad fairways are kind to the high handicapper while it’s risk/reward choices challenge the best. It is a relatively long course by Scottish standards. Though it’s overall length is just under 5700 yards, it is a par 70 with only one par 5. That makes the par-4’s quite long; five of them are between 400 and 437 yards. More importantly, Golspie offers variation and subtlety. It repeatedly asks you to make decisions as to how you will play. You can take the bold line with its inherent risk and potential reward or you can be more cautious in an effort to protect your card from disaster. Golspie is cleaver, hiding its secrets behind patches of heather or in unseen undulations in the fairway. It is an imaginative course, presenting you with greens that are saucered, domed, hidden beyond grass-tufted hills  or even two-tiered. Above all, it is a course of differences. Each hole offers something new. Each shot requires thought and even a bit of imagination.

The Golspie course was founded in 1889 on the links land south of the town and evolved over the years with input from the legendary James Braid. It seems to crouch under the eminence of Ben Bhraggie, the dominating mountain just inland that bears the much-larger-than-life statue of the First Duke of Sutherland. The Duke was one of the largest landowners in Europe in the 19th Century but is most remembered for “clearing” his property of thousands of highlanders whose families had rented the land they had farmed for generations. The Duke’s motive? He decided he could make more money by replacing the many farming families on his lands with a few sheep herders and their sheep. In the late 1700’s and early 1800’s thousands of poor families across the Sutherland lands and those of other large highland landowners were evicted, many times without warning and with no place to go. Elderly people were dragged from their cottages. Children were turned out to sleep in the rain and cold. They ended up in the industrial cities of Britain or as immigrants to Canada, Australia or the U.S.A. To commemorate his success with “improving” his land, the Duke’s family erected the huge statue on Ben Bhraggie from which his likeness can survey the land that has gone quite save the bleat of sheep.
 
 

Inverness Hub

Grantown-on-Spey Golf Club
South of Inverness
18 holes; par 70
link to course website

 
Granton on spey Golf Copurse, Scotland This very well-kept recreational/vacation course has everything that is needed for a pleasurable round of golf. Its pedigree is impressive enough, being originally laid out in 1890, it was expanded and reworked by none other than Willie Park of Musselburgh in 1911 and James Braid in 1921. Its topography varies from open park land to hilly woodland. Though it will punish bad play, it appears to be laid out so that the decent golfer will not experience many large disasters while the good golfer has an opportunity to score well. It’s wide fairways and large, gently sloping greens are balanced by its substantial length. Most fairway bunkers, while attractive looking, are placed so as to not interfere with reasonable play. Adding to Grantown-on-Spey’s delight of play are the highland scenery and other recreational opportunities available in this vacation destination. All-in all, it is an enjoyable course that should be included in the itinerary of highland golfers.
 
 

Northeast Hub

Hopeman Golf Club
In the Northeast
18 holes; par 68, 5624 Yards
link to course website

 
Hopeman for Scotland Golf

I have not played this course and so cannot offer a personal description. The club describes its course as follows:

"Originally a nine hole course, extended in 1985 making it probably one of the most demanding links courses in the North of Scotland. Most fairways are jealously guarded by gorse and broom, adding an additional challenge to members and visitors alike. The 517 yard 4th par 5 has recently been changed to a dog leg by selective tree planting. Many new bunkers have recently been added and the course lengthened."

"Having played the spectacular 12th with it's green nestling in the Clashach Cove over 150 feet below the tee, golfers are faced with panoramic views over the Moray Firth. Paul Lawrie recently described this hole as probably the best par 3 he has ever played. Many golfers standing on this tee have seen the local dolphins having fun in the firth below. The bloom on the gorse and broom during the summer months is an added attraction throughout the course."

 
 

Oban Hub

Inveraray Golf Club
East of Oban
9 holes, par 34
no website

 
Inverary Golf course, Scotland An open parkland course that stretches along the side of beautiful Loch Fyne, Inveraray is a fine little nine-holer that you need to play. Golf has been played for 100 years in this area though the course was moved from the other side of town to the present location in1993. Under the sponsorship of the current Duke of Argylle’s father, an old WWII military base was taken over, the Quonset huts removed (the base cookhouse oven and chimney can still be seen near the first hole) and a wonderful course created. Both local members and staff take great pride in the course’s maintenance and appearance. Many tees and greens were placed to take advantage of existing magnificent old oak, birch and beech trees. You will probably need to deposit your green fees in the “honesty box”.
 
 

Dornoch Hub
Inverness Hub

Invergordon Golf Club
North of Inverness
18 holes; par 69
link to course website

 
Invergordon Golf Course, Scotland

By Scottish standards, this course is relatively new. The first nine holes were installed in 1953 and the second nine added in1996. The general feeling of Invergordon is much closer to the good but typical American course than to what we expect from Scottish highland courses that are typically of the links style. Most fairways are relatively wide and sweeping with doglegs guarded by shallow fairway bunkers. With a few exceptions, their change in elevation is gradual and they do not have the undulations, hollows and humps typical of the links course. On the other hand, Invergordon is not as radically hilly as other highland non-links courses tend to be. The rough, especially on the newer holes, is wide and planted evenly with grass cut to a uniform height. The greens tend to be large gently rolling ovals, guarded by numerous but shallow bunkers.

Invergordon does not have the blind shots, hidden tricks and devious subtleties characteristic of older Scottish courses. What you see is pretty much what you get. Your primary concern when navigating the course is to keep the ball in the fairway and avoid the numerous bunkers.

The original nine holes wind through a wonderful forest with a wide variety of old deciduous trees that make a most enjoyable setting for golf. The new nine is planted well but needs to grow up and thus has a much more wide open feeling.

Play at Invergordon is certainly both enjoyable and challenging. For many Americans, it offers a bit of a relief from the difficulty of the Scottish links play. Here, you can relax into old habits while enjoying the round.  No, you won’t see a refreshment cart rolling around with beer and candy bars. They haven’t gone that far.
 
 

Dornoch Hub
Inverness Hub

Inverness Golf Club
In Inverness
18 holes; par 67
link to course website

 
Inverness Golf Course, Scotland

This nicely proportioned parkland course has a long history, being founded in 1908 and restored to service in 1946 after war-related use interrupted play. It meanders through the hills south of Inverness and features nicely mature trees that line many of its generous fairways. The rough is managed so that a penalty for a wayward shot is demanded but lost balls are kept to a minimum. The greens are large and gently contoured. On five holes water in the form of a burn comes into pay. Inverness features a variety in its holes, especially on the back nine, and is thus a welcome departure from other, more recently constructed parkland courses near Scotland’s city centers.

Bunkers constitute one of the most interesting features of Inverness. First, there is the total number. Inverness holes are protected by 74 bunkers across the course. But more interesting is their placement. To the player preparing to hit an approach on nine of Inverness’ holes, bunkers that appear to be greenside are actually situated between 4 and 35 yards in front of the front edge of the green. These “false greenside” bunkers create a visually confused sense of distance that disrupts your selection of clubs. The course also features a number of sets of two or three fairway bunkers, only the nearest of which is visible from the tee. The result of all of this is the need to pay close attention to distances to safe landing areas and greens if you want to avoid spending all day working on your sand shots.
 
 

Fife Hub

Irvine, Bogside Golf Club
Central Ayrshire
18 holes; par 71, 6408 yards
link to course website

 
 

I have not played this course and so cannot offer a personal description. The club describes its course as follows:

“The Irvine Golf Club, Bogside sports a traditional links course established over 100 years ago owing much of it's present day character to the design work of James Braid in 1926. The course provides a challenge to all with its subtle changes in direction and no two holes the same. Irvine Golf Club hosts the Final Qualifying Rounds for the Open Championship when it is held at Turnberry or Royal Troon.”

 
 

Oban Hub

Isle of Skye Golf Club
North of Oban on the Isle of Skye
9 holes; par 66
link to course website

 
Isle of Skye golf Course, Scotland

This course, sited on links land at the edge of the ocean, offers wonderful views of the Red Cuillins and Ben Tianavaig. At some time during your play you will probably see the ferry pass that runs between Skye and the Isle of Raasay across the sound.
Isle of Skye is currently a nine-holer but the members are looking forward to opening a second nine in the spring of 2005. As it is, the course offers the unusual feature of two different teeing areas for each hole. While some only differ by a few yards in their distance from the green others require you to come at the green from two very different directions. In this way, the nine greens are used to give you an eighteen-hole experience. Each hole bears a Gaelic name that refers to a particular landmark near the hole

The course plays in typical links style, though it does not have the sharply rolling fairways and undulating greens found on many links courses. Rather, its overall setting is on a large, gently rolling plane that gradually slopes from the clubhouse by the road down to the very edge of the sea.
 
 

Ayr Hub

Kilbirnie Place Golf Course
Northern Ayrshire
18 holes; par 69, 5400 yards
link to course website

 
 

I have not played this course and so cannot offer a personal description. The club describes its course as follows:

“Kilbirnie Place consists of a par 69 parkland course. Its relatively short length of some 5500 yds is compensated by tricky greens and natural hazards. Having enjoyed your round you can relax with a drink and something to eat in our friendly clubhouse. From the panoramic view overlooking the 18th green, you can watch how it should ... or shouldn't be done.”

 
 

Ayr Hub

Kilmarnock (Barassie) Golf Club
Central Ayrshire
27 holes; par 72, 6817 yards
link to course website

 
 

Here is a classic Scottish links course that sports long-running fairways, small, undulating greens and deep bunkers. A dominate feature is the large fields of heather that line manyof the fairways.

Since I played it last they have added another nine holes, apparently integrating them with some of the original 18 in a effort to improve what was already a very fine course. You know a course is of very high quality when it is used as a qualifying venue for the British Open as Kilmarnock is.

 
 

Fife Hub

Kingsbarns Golf Course
The Kingdom of Fife
18 holes; par 72, 7126 yards
link to course website

 
Kingsbarns Golf Course, Scotland

This course is a testimony of the power of deep pockets to create a marvelous golf course that succeeds in capturing all the subtleties and mystique of classic Scottish links golf by the sea. Since 2001 it has been consistently ranked in everybody’s list of the top-100 courses in the world. Though golf had been played near Kingsbarns Bay in East Fife for hundreds of years, all traces of the game disappeared during WW II, after which the land reverted to farming. Then, in the 1990’s, with a considerable infusion of international money and months of heavy earthmoving, a remarkably natural looking course of championship quality with spacious fairways and broad, undulating greens was carved near the sea. The results are stunning, both in their appeal to the eye and to the golf swing. The wispy rough and rolling fairways of fescue/bent turfgrass appear as if they have been growing in the sandy soil for ages. The course meanders along the rocky coast for 1.5 miles and takes advantage of tiered sea cliffs to step back and up from the sea. The result is a great amphitheater with round-stopping sea-views from every hole.

The course seems to offer everything a golfer would ask. Its small but testing par-3 15th hole is only 151 yards but asks you to fly your ball over the sea and rocky beach to a green that devilishly angles away from you as it increases in length and exposes more of your shot to the sea and disaster. Contrast this with its monster par-5 12th hole that stretches 538 yards, with the sea always on your left, to a whopping deep green that is 72 yards deep.

Beyond the wonderful golf that Kingsbarns offers, there are obvious indicators that the course was built to cater to serious golfers. There are no hotels or other recreational facilities associated with it, just the small, intimate and stylishly appointed clubhouse. Unlike almost all other Scottish courses, Kingsbarns does not have regular members. The management likes to think that it treats each visitor as a full-fledged member, even if only for the day. The ninth hole returns you to the clubhouse for mid-round refreshments, a feature unheard of on most Scottish links courses. Also, notice the generous size of the showerheads in the dressing rooms. Very un-Scottish.

 
 

Inverness Hub

Kingussie Golf Club
South of Inverness
18 holes; par 72
link to course website

 
Kingussie Golf Course, Scotland Though golf started at Kingussie in 1891, the locals asked for help from the great Harry Vardon when they decided to expand their course to 18 holes in 1908. They claim it plays now substantially as it did after Harry completed his work. Located at 1,000 ft. above sea level, Kingussie offers some striking views of the valley of the River Spey and the Cairngorm Mountains National Park beyond. Built on rather hilly terrain, you don't really get the sense of being on a long uphill/downhill trek and normally are able to hit off rather flat lies. Play is made interesting by the small River Gynack that either borders or crosses several holes. If you are in the area, you really need to give Kingussie a go. You will thoroughly enjoy it. Finely, if you are going to play the course, you need to know how to pronounce the name. It is "king-YOU-see."
 
 

Fife Hub

Kirkcaldy Golf Club
The Kingdom of Fife
18 holes; par 71, 6038 yards
link to course website

 
 

I have not played this course and so cannot offer a personal description. The club describes its course as follows:

“Kirkcaldy Golf Course was designed by the famous Tom Morris in 1904.It is a very attractive 18 Hole parkland course designed to challenge golfers of all standards. One of the many features is a traditional Scottish burn which meanders it’s way by five holes throughout the course. To complement the golf, players can sample the wonderful clubhouse facility, which provides excellent food and beverage in a friendly environment.”

 
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